Archive for the ‘Jeremiah 33’ Tag

Devotion for Wednesday After Proper 14, Year C (ELCA Daily Lectionary)   1 comment

Jeremiah

Above:  Jeremiah

Image in the Public Domain

Waiting for God, Part II

AUGUST 14, 2019

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The Collect:

Almighty God, you sent your Holy Spirit to be the life and light of your church.

Open our hearts to the riches of your grace,

that we may be ready to receive you wherever you appear,

through Jesus Christ, our Savior and Lord.  Amen.

Evangelical Lutheran Worship (2006), page 44

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The Assigned Readings:

Jeremiah 33:14-26

Psalm 89:1-18

Luke 12:41-48

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I shall sing the faithful love of Yahweh for ever,

from age to age my lips shall declare your constancy,

for you have said:  love is built to last for ever,

you have fixed your constancy firm in the heavens.

–Psalm 89:1-2, The New Jerusalem Bible (1985)

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The theme of waiting for God overlaps with the theme of keeping the covenant.  Violating the covenant has dire consequences for the people of the Kingdoms of Israel and Judah in the Hebrew Bible.  We read the Book of Jeremiah in the knowledge that his warnings fell mostly on deaf ears.  One obstacle to keeping the covenant is the perception that God’s timing is delayed.  Some might think that God will never keep divine promises.

Why keep divine commandments?,

they might wonder.  From that thought flows disobedience.

Such impatience is a spiritual weakness.  God (A) is never late and (B) relates to time differently than we do.  I, as a mere mortal, am unqualified to know exactly how God relates to time.  In that respect God is other and unknowable.  If God seems late, the problem is with our perception and expectations, not with God.

Learning to trust in God, often despite all we do not know, is challenging.  I do not pretend to have mastered it, for I struggle with it often.  Even the reality of those struggles is positive, for it indicates a constructive engagement with God.  It is something, at least, and something is more than nothing.  God can work with something and multiply it.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

MARCH 23, 2016 COMMON ERA

WEDNESDAY IN HOLY WEEK

THE FEAST OF GEORGE RUNDLE PRYNNE, ANGLICAN PRIEST, POET, AND HYMN WRITER

THE FEAST OF SAINT GREGORY THE ILLUMINATOR, PATRIARCH OF ARMENIA

THE FEAST OF HEINRICH VON LAUFENBERG, GERMAN ROMAN CATHOLIC PRIEST AND HYMN WRITER

THE FEAST OF SAINT TURIBIUS OF MOGROVEJO, ROMAN CATHOLIC ARCHBISHOP OF LIMA

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https://blogatheologica.wordpress.com/2016/03/23/waiting-for-god-part-ii/

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Devotion for Tuesday and Wednesday After Proper 25, Year B (ELCA Daily Lectionary)   1 comment

Icon of Elisha 02

Above:  Icon of Elisha

Image in the Public Domain

Trusting in God

OCTOBER 30 and 31, 2018

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The Collect:

Eternal light, shine in our hearts.

Eternal wisdom, scatter the darkness of our ignorance.

Eternal compassion, have mercy on us.

Turn us to seek your face, and enable us to reflect your goodness,

through Jesus Christ, our Savior and Lord.  Amen.

Evangelical Lutheran Worship (2006), page 51

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The Assigned Readings:

2 Kings 6:8-23 (Tuesday)

Jeremiah 33:1-11 (Wednesday)

Psalm 119:17-24 (Both Days)

Acts 9:32-35 (Tuesday)

Matthew 20:29-34 (Wednesday)

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Do not repay anyone evil for evil, but take thought for what is noble in the sight of all.  If it is possible, so far as it depends on you, live peaceably with all.  Beloved, never avenge yourselves, but leave room for the wrath of God; for it is written, “Vengeance is mine, I will repay, says the Lord.”  No, “if your enemies are hungry, feed them; if they are thirsty, give them something to drink; for by doing this you will heap burning coals on their heads.”  Do not be overcome by evil, but overcome evil with good….Owe no one anything, except to love one another; for the one who loves has fulfilled the law.

–Romans 12:17-21; 13:1, The New Revised Standard Version (1989)

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This is an interesting set of readings.  The pericopes from the New Testament are stories of individual healing, the portion of Psalm 119 expresses respect for and delight in divine law, the lesson from Jeremiah 33 promises divine healing of the Hebrew people after divine punishment thereof, and the account in 2 Kings 6 is odd.  Somehow Elisha is a clairvoyant who has God’s ear, delivers a force of Aramean raiders into the hands of the King of Israel, and advises giving them food and drink before releasing them.  (There is an interesting military tactic.)

A few thoughts come to mind:

  1. The motif of healing, both individual and collective, is strong. Even individual healing has a collective component, for it restores one to wholeness in his or her family, community, network of friends, et cetera.
  2. The humane treatment of the Aramean raiders demonstrates strength and reduces tensions.  The equivalent of stuffing one’s adversaries with tea and crumpets (if I may be British) is certainly unexpected and provides no incentive for further violence, at least in the short-term future.  It is also consistent with the ethics of Romans 12:17-21.
  3. The balance of judgment and mercy in God is a mystery I cannot even begin to unravel, so I more along to matters not too great for me.
  4. One should have a healthy sense of awe of and gratitude to God.  One can be confident in the faithfulness of God and therefore act boldly and properly, not foolishly and out of fear.

Perhaps the theme which unites these lessons best begins with the faithfulness of God to divine promises.  We, assured of that fidelity, will, by grace, act out of confidence in and obedience to God, in whom exist both judgment and mercy.  We will reap what we sow, either positive or negative.  If we trust God, we will feel sufficiently secure to act righteously, even to extend kindness to our enemies.  That ethic is consistent with the following passage from 1 Peter 3:

Finally, be united, all of you, in thought and feeling; be full of brotherly affection, kindly, and humble.  Do not repay wrong with wrong, or abuse with abuse; on the contrary, respond with a blessing, for a blessing is what God intends you to receive.

–Verses 8-9, The Revised English Bible (1989)

We humans make many of our worst decisions out of fear.  Often we make bad situations worse in so doing.  This generalization holds true in individual and collective settings.  Yet proper confidence in the faithfulness of God strips away the misconception that we must do something when we ought to get out of God’s way.  Letting go and letting God when doing that is appropriate precludes making foolish, fear-based decisions which reveal our lack of trust.  Ignorance is frequently a complicating factor in making good decisions, for how are we to know when to be active and when to be passive?

May we decide wisely, by grace.

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

JULY 4, 2015 COMMON ERA

INDEPENDENCE DAY (U.S.A.)

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https://blogatheologica.wordpress.com/2015/07/04/trusting-in-god-5/

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Devotion for November 17 (LCMS Daily Lectionary)   1 comment

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Above:  Christ with Crown of Thorns, Looking Up

Image Created (1898) by Fred Holland Day (1864-1933)

Image Source = Library of Congress

Reproduction Number = LC-USZ62-95998

Jeremiah and Matthew, Part XII:  Not in Paradise Yet

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2019

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Blessed Lord, who caused all holy scriptures to be written for our learning:

Grant us so to hear them, read, mark, learn, and inwardly digest them,

that we may embrace and ever hold fast the blessed hope of everlasting life,

which you have given us in our Savior Jesus Christ;

who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit,

one God, for ever and ever.  Amen.

The Book of Common Prayer (1979), page 236

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The Assigned Readings:

Jeremiah 33:1-22

Psalm 67 (Morning)

Psalms 46 and 93 (Evening)

Matthew 27:11-32

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The assigned Psalms today speak of God being glorious, gracious, and, in the words of Psalm 46:1:

…our refuge and strength,

a very present help in trouble.

The Book of Common Prayer (2004)

That imagery fits well with Jeremiah 33:1-22, a prophesy of a time when God will restore the Davidic Dynasty and the Levitical line, a time when faithful people will

thrill and quiver because of all the good fortune

God will provide (verse 9, TANAKH;  The Holy Scriptures).

Yet one member of that Davidic line faced humiliation and torture–even a crown of thorns–in Matthew 27:11-32.  The people did not live in Jeremiah’s idealized Yahwistic kingdom.

Neither do you and I, O reader.  Although we mere mortals cannot create paradise on earth, we can make earth more like paradise.  We can work for the common good.  We can embrace the cause of civil rights and equal protection under the law for all God’s children.  We can strive for greater environmental stewardship.  All of the above fall under the heading of what Lutheran confessions of faith call “civil righteousness”–that which is laudable yet inadequate to save us from sin.  But such good works are part of our mandate from God.  They constitute faithful responses to God’s grace.  And they reduce the amount of dissonance between what is and what can be when, as N. T. Wright is fond of writing, “God becomes king.”

KENNETH RANDOLPH TAYLOR

JUNE 4, 2013 COMMON ERA

THE FEAST OF SAINT FRANCIS CARACCIOLO, COFOUNDER OF THE MINOR CLERKS REGULAR

THE FEAST OF JOHN XXIII, BISHOP OF ROME

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http://blogatheologica.wordpress.com/2013/06/06/jeremiah-and-matthew-part-xii-not-in-paradise-yet/

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